Ōgonkan

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Ki-mikan (黄蜜柑?) or Ōgonkan (黄金柑?)

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Eudicots

(unranked):
Rosids

Order:
Sapindales

Family:
Rutaceae

Genus:
Citrus

Species:
C. flaviculpus

Binomial name

Citrus flaviculpus hort. ex. Tanaka

Ōgonkan (黄金柑, “golden citrus”?) or Ki-mikan (黄蜜柑, “yellow mikan”?) are the common names for a small sized variety of Japanese citrus, whose rind is of a characteristic “golden” bright yellow color.
The variety has been published as the species Citrus flaviculpus by Chōzaburō Tanaka in his 160-species scheme, but this is considered an effort of a “splitter,” as opposed to Swingle’s classification system which is generally preferred in the West.
Alternate spellings (romanizations) include “Ougonkan”[1] or “Ogon-kan”.[2] It has also been called “Golden orange” in Kanagawa Prefecture.

Contents

1 History
2 Fruit
3 Regional production
4 Hybrid crossing
5 See also
6 Notes
7 References
8 External links

History[edit]
The variety has long been known in Kagoshima Prefecture as Ki-mikan (黄蜜柑, “yellow mikan”?) but, precise origins are unknown.[3]
According to one assertion, it has been known in Higashi-ichiki-chō (ja) and its neighborhood (now Hioki, Kagoshima) since the Meiji Period.[citation needed] Anecdotally in this Hioki area, it has been told that the variety was either introduced by the Jesuit Francisco de Xavier[citation needed], or brought back from the Korean Peninsula during the campaigns in the late 16th century (Hideyoshi’s invasions of Korea).[citation needed]. It has been suggested that the name “Ōgonkan” was dubbed by Harutarō Muramatsu (村松春太郎?) who introduced the variety to Ehime Prefecture,[citation needed] but this too is poorly documented.
Fruit[edit]
The small fruit has a diameter of 4 to 5 cm, weighing 60 to 80 g.[4] The rind, which is bright yellow, can be peeled by hand but with difficulty.[5] It issues a distinct fragrance, and is considerably sweet tasting, with some balancing acidity. Harvested from February to April. Seedless (Self-incompatibility) traits have been observed.[6]
Its fragrances is similar to the Hyuganatsu, which is another bright yellow citrus that is larger-sized,[4] but somewhat sweeter by comparison. And like the Hyuganatsu, the white pith (albedo) may be eaten.[4]
The rind’s cold-pressed oil has been studied for fragrance factors, and was found to contain limonene (
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